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British Apaches arrive in Norway for the historic deployment to the Arctic

The first AH-64 Apache attack helicopters of the British Army Air Corps have arrived in Norway for the historic deployment to the Arctic.

656 Squadron AAC squadron of the British Army’s Army Air Corps have arrived in Norway for the inaugural deployment of Apache helicopters to the Arctic.

British Apaches to take part in biggest military drill into the extreme cold weather environment.

The Arctic warfare exercise in Norway was signed off by Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson as a warning to Moscow amid escalating Russian aggression towards Europe.

According to express.co.uk, more than 1,000 British commandos, as well as US, Dutch and Norwegian Marines will be in Norway in upcoming weeks to practise a counter-attack against Vladimir Putin’s forces.

A total of 8,000 troops are involved.

It will be the biggest Arctic military exercise by the British Armed Forces and in 20 years.

It comes amid escalating Russian aggression towards Europe, with Cold War levels of submarine activity reported in the Northern Atlantic and frequent air incursions on UK airspace.

And since Putin’s Novichok attack on former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury last year, tensions between London and Moscow have been on a knife-edge.

656 Squadron have arrived in Norway for the inaugural deployment of Apache helicopters to the Arctic. Flying to start in the next few days… bring on the snow!#attack #attackhelicopter #ExCLOCKWORK #teamwork #britisharmy #656Sqn #AAC #Armyaviation #Apache #coldweather #Arctic pic.twitter.com/ZOrLBtUZbo

— 4 Regiment AAC (@4RegimentAAC) 7 January 2019

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Read more here:: Defence Blog (Air)

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